Emma Versteegh

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Curriculum Vitae

Silent witnesses

NASA: Extreme shrimp may hold clues to alien life

NASA: Extreme shrimp may hold clues to alien life

Originally posted on fox13now.com:
Shrimp crawling around rock chimneys spewing hot water deep in the Caribbean Sea may hold clues to the kinds of life that can thrive in extreme environments on other planets, NASA says. The shrimp are called Rimicaris hybisae (no, we can’t pronounce it either). They live in clumps on…

Extreme Shrimp May Hold Clues to Alien Life

Originally posted on Emma Versteegh:
Shrimp called Rimicaris hybisae at deep hydrothermal vents in the Caribbean seem to have different dietary habits depending on the proximity of other shrimp. Those who live in dense clusters like this one live off bacteria primarily, but in areas where the shrimp are distributed more sparsely, the shrimp are…

Santa Cruz

Earlier this month I gave a seminar at the University of California Santa Cruz, Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, in their Whole Earth Seminar series. A very enjoyable experience. Their campus is a redwood forest, and the people were very welcoming and interested. Though, I maybe should have talked about shells instead of hydrothermal […]

The world’s deepest hydrothermal vents: An analog for Europa?

Two weeks ago a group of students from the University of Southern California visited JPL. They all did a summer program in ocean sciences. I was one of the people telling them what “real” ocean scientists do at JPL.

Previously unsuspected dietary habits of Rimicaris hybisae

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Qualifications

2009: PhD Earth Sciences, VU University Amsterdam.
2005: Postgraduate teaching degree Biology. Utrecht University.
2003: MSc Marine Ecology. Utrecht University.

Employment

2015 – present: Lecturer biology. Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences. School of Education.
2015: Biology teacher. Dr. Mollercollege, Waalwijk.
2013 – 2014: Postdoctoral scholar. NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. California Institute of Technology.
2010 – 2013: Postdoctoral research assistant. University of Reading. Department of Geography and Environmental Science.
2009 – 2010: Postdoctoral researcher. Vrije Universiteit Brussel. Department of Geology / Analytical and Environmental Chemistry.
2005 – 2009: Junior researcher. VU University Amsterdam. Department of Marine Biogeology.
2003 – 2005: Teacher in biology and science. Pax Christi College, Druten.

Invited talks and colloquia

2016
GeoVUsie student society for earth sciences. VU University Amsterdam. Silent witnesses – Biogenic carbonates as archives of environmental changes. January 2016.

2014
Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, University of California Santa Cruz, CA, USA. The world’s deepest hydrothermal vents: biogeochemistry of an alien environment. October 2014.
Postdoc seminar series, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA, USA. Hydrothermal vent rogue cannibal shrimp investigated by stable isotope analysis. May 2014.
Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Leiden, the Netherlands. Stable-isotope proxies in palaeoclimatology and palaeoecology. January 2014.

2013
Instrument Systems Implementation & Concepts, NASA Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA, USA. Previously unsuspected dietary habits of hydrothermal vent fauna. December 2013.
Netherlands Forensic Institute, The Hague, the Netherlands. The role of (GC-)IRMS in forensic research. April 2013.
Archaeological Sciences, University of Bradford, UK. Biogenic carbonates as archives of environmental change. March 2013.

2012
Institute for Geosciences, Johannes Gutenberg Universität, Mainz, Germany. The worm thermometer – what earthworm calcite granules can tell us about past environments. September 2012.
Department of Geography and Environmental Science, University of Reading, UK. The worm thermometer – what earthworm calcite granules can tell us about past environments. May 2012.

2011
Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames IA, USA. Earthworms – unusual biomineralisers. October 2011.
Chemical Analysis Facility, University of Reading, UK. Where does the C in earthworm secreted calcite come from? April 2011.

2010
Department of Geography and Environmental Science, University of Reading, UK. Silent witnesses – Freshwater bivalves as archives of environmental variability in the Rhine-Meuse delta. November 2010.
Department of Geography and Environmental Science, University of Reading, UK. Bivalve stable isotope records as archives of past environmental variability. September 2010.
Benelux Association of Stable Isotope Scientists (BASIS). Skeletal stable isotope ratios of calcifying marine organisms as proxies for past climate and human impact. April 2010.

2009
The Palynological Society and The Palaeobiological Society of the Netherlands/Flanders. What can freshwater mussels tell about the history of the Dutch river area? October 2009.
Workshop Bivalve biomineralisationThe royal Flemish academy of Belgium for science and the arts, Brussels, Belgium Brussels, Belgium. Bivalve growth increments reflect seasonal stable isotope variations of ambient water in the rivers Rhine and Meuse. May 2009.

2008
Netherlands Research School of Sedimentary Geology (NSG). Freshwater bivalves record Meuse droughts – Stable oxygen isotopes in shell aragonite tell of past river dynamics. November 2008
The Palaeobiological Society of the Netherlands/Flanders. Freshwater mussels as an archive for river floods. April 2008.

2007
Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia. The Chemistry of freshwater mussels as a proxy for Late Holocene river conditions. May 2007.

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